Tagged: “UU”

New Goal Exempt...

Now all UU Religious Professionals can raise funds for education, credentialing, and development exempt from the goal threshold.

Solidarity with UU’s Imprisoned in Illinois

UU Prison Ministry of Illinois asks your help supporting people returned from prison as well as UU’s still in prison.  One way we do this is through small grants to “solidarity circle leaders” with crisis needs such as housing, clothing, transportation, or medical care. 

For UU’s in prison we organize UU pen pals and make small additions to their commissary accounts to help buy sanitary supplies or food.  We also are piloting a program with UU’s in prison to work with their pen pals to guide our advocacy work for alternatives to incarceration and to reduce the harm caused by incarceration. 

Reaching the $3000 goal would provide emergency assistance to 2 solidarity circle leaders for a year and commissary contributions for 60 UU’s in Illinois prisons. 

Reaching the stretch goal of $6000 would do this and provide funds for supplies and staff time to run the pilot advocacy program. 

UUPMI consists of UU volunteers from Illinois who organize people in prisons and jails based on UU principles.  We connect people inside with UU pen pals in our congregations.  We organize reentry solidarity circles centering around leaders returning to the community.  We promote systemic change to end incarceration and to build justice, and carry this message to UU’s through sermons by our UU minister and workshops for UU’s.  We partner with UU Advocacy Network of Illinois and other organizations on advocacy.  We are supported financially by UU’s individually and by over a dozen UU congregations in IL with shared offerings.

Fund The VUU: A Unitarian Universalist Talk Show

The VUU is a weekly Unitarian Universalist talk show discussing important faith-based topics from an anti-racist, anti-oppressive, and multicultural perspective. Every Thursday for the past 7 years, the hosts of The VUU have welcomed guests from every corner of Unitarian Universalism. Our guest lineup includes scholars, writers, activists, and religious thought-leaders who are shaping Unitarian Universalism for the 21st century and beyond.  The VUU has been committed to bringing you episodes that are newsworthy and entertaining!


Over 320 episodes,

with more than 800 guests,

and countless hours of research, preparation, and production.

We need your help to keep The VUU going!


Since 2013, the Church of the Larger Fellowship has dedicated thousands of staff and volunteer hours to producing and streaming episodes of The VUU. Each one-hour episode requires several hours of preparation. It takes time and resources to find qualified guests, outline a script and set up the technological requirements to stream live to Facebook and YouTube. After each episode is aired, a staff member or Learning Fellow allocates time from their work schedule to edit, re-master, and upload The VUU episode as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.

When you donate to this campaign, you support:

  • In-depth topic curation and research
  • Qualified and knowledgeable guests
  • Increased accessibility (such as captioning)
  • Staff hours to prep and produce each episode
  • Resources to make each episode available after it is aired live
  • Graphic design needs
  • Educational material for viewers

The VUU has been downloaded over 95,000 times,

with hundreds of weekly viewers,

and thousands of monthly listeners.

A donation of any amount helps continue this ministry.


The VUU streams live on Facebook & YouTube every Thursday at 12:00 p.m. ET // 9:00 a.m. PT. The VUU aims to get people informed, inspired, and connected. Thousands of people have fallen in love with The VUU‘s inclusive, conversational format and enjoy that the show focuses on inviting a new guest each week to discuss issues that they are passionate about and matters that are close to their heart. The passion and commitment of both the hosts and the guests is tangibly felt, even though the screen. The Church of the Larger Fellowship is proud of the past 7 years of producing The VUU and hope, with your help, we can continue to air episodes of The VUU long into the future.


“As a Religious Professional working outside of a congregation, The VUU keeps me up to date with what’s going on in UUism–but more than that–it’s the “water cooler” experience I miss with my colleagues! Feeling like I’m getting to sit in on conversations between The VUU hosts, and participate via chat, is the collegial community I need.”–Janine Gelsinger, Executive Director of UU Justice Arizona & Supporter of The VUU


If you haven’t already, we hope you visit our YouTube channel to watch a few episodes of The VUU. After you fall in love with the show, we know you will, we hope we can count on your support to keep this program alive.

For more about The VUU and our upcoming shows, visit questformeaning.org/vuu.

Due to the generosity of the Unitarian Universalist Veatch Program at Shelter Rock, every dollar you donate will be matched.

From Detention to Asylum

Stretch Goal- Housing for Ana (description below)

Consistent with the Unitarian Universalist principles affirming the inherent worth and dignity of every person with justice, equity, and compassion in human relations, and the goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all; we declare ourselves as a Sanctuary Congregation in alignment with the Iowa Sanctuary Movement.

In July, 2020 a person from Central America seeking asylum in the United States was released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention and arrived in the Quad Cities. The Unitarian Universalist Service Committee (UUSC) arranged for the asylum seeker to be released, with the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the Quad Cities (UUCQC) as their sponsor.

It is legal to enter this country to seek asylum, but in recent years many black and brown asylum seekers have been removed from the United States while awaiting decisions on their cases. Others have been locked in detention centers where they have little or no access to legal or other help and are now in danger of contracting Covid-19.

Support during the legal process, which is expected to take a year or more, is being provided by the Sanctuary Project of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation and the Quad Cities Sanctuary Coalition. This person is living with a member family of the Congregation, so current housing costs are covered. All other needs and legal fees are being provided through community fundraising. The asylum seeker is taking the opportunity to learn English and how to navigate in this new culture.

It is estimated that supporting one person for a year will cost $10,000, of which at least $5,000 is for legal fees. Due to more ICE appointments than initially anticipated, transportation costs for each 350 mile round-trip appointment have increased our funding needs by at least $2,000.

Please join us opening your heart in the support of our guest asylum seeker by making a donation today.

 

Help Create a Brighter Future for Vulnerable Transylvanian Girls

DISASTER RELIEF CAMPAIGN: ALL donations will be processed immediately

(NO ALL-OR-NOTHING GOAL FOR THIS CAMPAIGN)

Background. At the height of nationwide lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic, up to 1.6 billion children were affected by school closures, causing the largest mass disruption of education in modern history (Source: UNICEF). Many schools around the world, including in Romania, remain closed or experience intermittent closures, making remote learning essential to children’s education. Although Romanian authorities promised to ensure that all children have the necessary devices to join the online educational system, the distribution of devices has often not reached children from vulnerable groups.

What will the funds be used for? In times of crisis, access to digital technologies is critical. The International Women’s Convocation has teamed up with the Unitarian Providence Charity Organization to provide electronic devices (laptops) for girls who are disadvantaged or living with disabilities – from both rural and urban areas – so they will be able to attend school remotely.

Vulnerable girls cannot afford interruption in their education. Disruption to learning only exacerbates existing inequalities, leaving girls even more vulnerable to abuse, early pregnancy, and poverty. With your help, we can provide access to education for girls who may not otherwise have the chance in a COVID-19 world — and ensure that they have the choice to write their own futures. Thank you for your support!

Project Partner: Unitarian Providence Charity Organization, whose mission is to fulfill the vocation of the Hungarian Unitarian Church by serving people and communities in need without discrimination. The project benefits economically disadvantaged girls and girls with disabilities in Transylvania. Through this project, we are living our U*U values, bringing positive change in the world by connection, care, compassion, social justice, and service.


Project Endorsements

Rev. Attila Vagyas (on the right), Providence Organization (Gondviselés Segélyszervezet): Even though Romania is part of the European Union and thus beneficiary of EU’s social development programs, many are left behind. Our organization reaches many isolated rural communities, where we have gotten to know vulnerable girls full of potential. In these troubled times, when remote learning is the new normal, access to a digital device has become a matter of access to basic education – and an opportunity to make the most of one’s life. With your help, we can give some of these girls a hope for the future.


Some of the Beneficiaries

Klaudia Sebesi, Székelykeresztúr / Cristuru Secuiesc

Twin girls Erzsébet Emő Veres and Ilona Emilia Veres, Barót / Baraolt

UU Wellspring Emerging...

UU Wellspring is a spiritual deepening program designed to inspire UUs to live into their UU faith and to connect with one another soul to soul. It’s time our emerging young adults also had this transformational opportunity.

The Faithify Campaign will cover the cost of our first group so there will be no cost to participants. The funds will go toward development of the program, additional promotion for more programs and co-leaders who are fairly paid.

The UU Wellspring program begins by deepening participants’ understandings of the UU Sources. These 90-minute weekly sessions draw emerging young adult UUs together at a time when they may be losing hope. The connections made with peers and the introduction of a regular spiritual practice aims to brings gratitude, beauty and hope.

Over 50 congregations and hundreds of adults have been transformed in UU Wellspring small group ministry over the past fifteen years. Since the pandemic, many have found UU Wellspring to be the primary link to their faith and their anchor in these challenging times.

UU Wellspring has been generously funded by grants from both UU Funding and the Unitarian Sunday School Society grant.

 

Virtual Worship Elements...

Hey, we get it- preparing virtual worship every week is hard! Please accept this gift for UUA congregations to help lighten the load. Here’s two paired elements, a “story” and a longer reflection, on the theme of Obstacles, Play, and Teamwork. Both elements were written and delivered by Credentialed Religious Educator and Faithify Project Manager, […]

The Joy (and...

What would it look like if teams were rooted in JOY, play, problem solving, and collaboration?

Insulated Coveralls for the Homeless

At Grenfell Ministries we are a Unitarian Universalist outreach in Hamilton, Ontario.

Due to assistance from Cantex Distribution (a company in Niagara) we have been able to secure a really great deal on quilted, insulated coveralls and instead of paying $250 a pair we are able to pay $40 a pair. With four thousand dollars we can put 100 of these on the street for folks suffering this winter with homelessness. We have already place 25 into circulation and have ordered 30 more.

Grenfell Ministries, a Unitarian Universalist faith-based Ministry that aims to provide support to marginalized communities through programming that focuses on seniors, youth, those experiencing homelessness folks who use substances, and those who are or were formerly incarcerated. We serve with integrity, compassion and promote individuality and self-empowerment. We are committed to building communities through advocacy and activism.

We are a peer-run, peer-led organization that strives to improve the quality of life for those we serve on their terms. In solidarity, we offer organized voices of lived experience in the hopes of encouraging programming, policy adaptation and to reduce stigma and discrimination. We collaborate with various organizations and services to assist folks with meeting their needs and offer grief support to families who have lost loved ones to the overdose epidemic on an individual and group basis.

​Our projects have received funding in part by the Fund for Unitarian Universalist Social Responsibility, United Way Phase 2 and Phase 3 Funding for COVID-19 pandemic response and the Hamilton Community Foundation.

Fire and Accessibility: Rebuilding and Outreach in Appalachia

DISASTER RELIEF: All donations processed as they are given.

(NO ALL-OR NOTHING GOAL FOR THIS CAMPAIGN)

The essence of this fundraiser is to raise $9,500 to make necessary repairs to our building and surrounding property after a fire 5 years ago, repairs that had been delayed due to lack of funding, and to make needed accessibility additions, so that we may return our full focus on outreach in Appalachia, and to create a more inclusive ministry. We are a UUA congregation and we will be happy to supply a receipt for your tax deduction purposes.

OUR CLAIM FOR UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISM:

For decades, the Unitarian Fellowship of Huntington, WV, a UUA congregation, has worked to be an active member of our community. Not only do we offer a weekly Sunday Fellowship meeting that balances the UUA order of service with enlightened educational discussion, but we have also participated in and hosted dozens of community events, meetings, gatherings, and spiritual celebrations each year, including: AA/NA Meetings; PFLAG Meetings; Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition Meetings; Lambda Meetings; Weekly Meditations; Monthly Drum Circles; Boardgame Nights; Participation in the annual Marshall University Earth Day Celebration; Participation in the annual Huntington Sustainability Fair; Educational Workshops and Lectures on Yoga, Climate Change, Social Justice, Art, etc.; and Holiday Celebrations on Solstices, Equinoxes, Christmas/Yule, Halloween/All Souls Day, etc. We’ve even hosted visits from local and international Buddhist Monks. Suffice to say, we are an active bunch, doing our best to live by our shared 7 Principles and to be an active positive influence on our region. All of the work to maintain and perpetuate our Fellowship is done by volunteers.

Our congregation is particularly motivated to be involved in matters of Social Justice & Environmental Activism, and to encourage each other on our paths to seek truth and personal growth. We have families, children, teenagers, single persons, married persons, elders and LGBTQ persons. One group we are less able to minister to, however, would be those with serious mobility challenges, as our Fellowship Hall does not have a wheelchair ramp. This is one of the things were are asking funding for.

Our vision involves a few things: Providing an inclusive space that is safe and welcoming where people feel comfortable to attend while they search for truth; ministering without judgment to those who need it in an area that can be very judgmental; setting an example of environmentally friendly and sustainable use and maintenance of our property; participating in matters of social justice; and perpetuating personal improvement and growth. Our members are passionate, intelligent, diverse, and have a desire to make an impact.

We are especially involved in the sustainability renaissance that has been happening in our area. To that end, we have partnered with a number of area organizations to host a number of green workshops and events in 2021, such as: Urban Orchard pruning and maintenance, hosted by WV Extension Service; Composting & Sustainable Urban Agriculture, hosted by the Marshall University Sustainability Department, Native Edible Perennials, hosted by Appalachian Forest Herbs, and a series of outdoor movie nights called “Green Movies Under The Stars”, hosted by the Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition. All have verified their commitment through either letters or email.

OUR NEED:

On September 5, 2015, our Fellowship experienced an electrical fire that caused significant damage throughout our building. Through our Church Mutual insurance and our 2015 Faithify fundraiser, we were able to fund and make many significant and necessary repairs. However, we were unable to raise enough funds for all repairs, the largest of which is rebuilding the rear roofed stairs and decking that provided secondary access to both the first and second floors, which is a serious safety issue, and further brick mortar repair to adjacent walls.

The rear roofed stairs and deck were significantly damaged in the fire and had to be torn down. The bricking mortar was damaged as well, with sections so deteriorated that you can stick a finger into the mortar and watch it turn to dust. We have been without stairs out back ever since then, leaving the second floor without a secondary exit and thus unsafe in the case of another fire emergency, and making it impossible to move from the kitchen to the backyard, as there is more than a 4-foot drop. This has made utilizing our backyard meeting space complicated to say the least. Moving from inside the kitchen to out back requires going outside, walking around the building to the side gate (a found discarded piece of fencing our volunteers had turned into a somewhat functional gate). This inability to move directly from backyard to kitchen has also meant we cannot lock the gates from the inside, which has led to substantial vandal damage to our fencing.

Due to COVID-19, gatherings at the church greatly increased our use of your backyard. When the case counts were lower and stay-at-home orders were not in effect, we alternated online zoom services with in-person outside masked meetings every-other-week. At our Fellowship Hall, we either gathered on the small front porch when numbers were small enough to keep 6-feet or more apart, or in the backyard. We even hosted a few garden workdays and an Autumnal Equinox celebration using this space. Since new stay-at-home orders and a significant rise in cases in our county, we moved to virtual gatherings only in early October. But for the months we could gather, our backyard space was invaluable.

In plain fact, however, our backyard is not currently friendly to anyone with mobility challenges. There are some dips and holes in the yard that need leveled out, and entrance areas really need to be made more stable with leveling and concrete paving squares. Our fencing needs some repairs, too, due to age and vandal damage, and the gating needs replaced with something more stable, secure, and accessibility friendly.

Our Fellowship Hall greatly needs a wheelchair ramp, too, as it is currently only accessible via the front porch stairs and side door entrance stairs. Anyone utilizing a wheelchair or walker would have great difficulty joining in our fellowship meetings or community outreach events.

Given that things will likely continue to be complicated concerning COVID-19 and future mutations of the virus, the use of outside gathering spaces will continue to be a necessary option. As we work to improve and expand our outreach, we wish to make both our inside and outside Fellowship Hall meeting spaces more accessible. To that end, we wish to install a wheelchair ramp for easy access to our front porch and inside meeting space, and add level paving stones and light, easy to open yet secure gating to our backyard meeting area.

GOAL:

We need to raise $9,500.00 in 45 days for these delayed fire damage repairs and needed accessibility additions. Here is how we have come to this fundraising goal amount:

  • For installation of new roofed decking and stairs to both the “ground” floor and the 2nd story on the back of the building, and mortar repair to that general area, material and supply estimates have run upwards of $3,000, with approximately $4,000 for bonded, certified labor.
  • Stephen Zoeller, a volunteer with Faith In Action of the River Cities, has been building wheelchair ramps for people and organizations in the community for over 15 years. He’s promised his volunteer labor and expertise to construct our new wheelchair ramp, with some volunteer help from our UFoH members, and has provided an official estimate for materials and supplies at $1,200.
  • For installation of lightweight lockable gates (for sturdy security and ease of opening by those who use wheelchairs), and a few panels of new fencing along the back that are more vandal resistant, estimates for the vinyl gates and wood paneling materials and supplies are around $800, with labor provided by UFoH members.
  • For leveling of backyard “dips”& holes, and leveling of gated entrance areas using concrete paving squares, gravel, weed barrier fabric, and sand, estimates for materials and supplies are around $500, with labor provided by UFoH members.

Total ask would be for $9,500.

Any additional funds that are raised will go towards building more vertical and raised gardening areas and increasing the paving square zones in our yard, so as to improve accessibility and increase participation in fellowship meetings and community outreach events by anyone with mobility challenges.

CONCLUSION:

If these repairs and accessibility additions were completed, our congregation could better focus on the UFoH’s vision and outreach mission, including our “2021 green push” workshops and movie nights, foster a more inclusive ministry, and be personally involved in perpetuating the positive social changes slowly arriving in our area. We live in an area that is not always receptive to social changes. We desire to spend our energy on preserving and promoting the health of the sacred interdependent web of existence by practicing and educating the community on sustainability measures, growing food, and recycling/up-cycling. We have several ministers here that are happy to conduct same-sex marriages. Perhaps it would be of interest to you that we have an agreement which was voted upon in 2011 that if the Unitarian Fellowship of Huntington should ever experience dissolution; that the church building (which we own without debt) would be sold and the funds from the sale would be given to the UUA Ohio Meadville district. So, any investments made into this project would ultimately return to the UUA.

We understand that these are significant requests for assistance and would be glad for any help that could be sent our way. We thank you for your consideration.

In Love and Peace,

Linda R. Greer
President of the Unitarian Fellowship of Huntington
619 6th Avenue
Huntington, WV 25701

UU Free Library | Philippines

We live in an era of incredible story-telling and the recentering of peoples and communities who have been historically exploited, marginalized, and invisibilized. Books are at the center of lifelong learning, building community, and making meaning.

As new literature and media expand, there remains however a deep inequality. Throughout much of Southeast Asia, books are a luxury and public libraries are rare. For millions here, a book costs a week’s salary. Many cities and barangays (neighborhoods) lack a public library. Few feminist, liberal religious, environmental justice, and human rights books are available.

CORAL is a Unitarian Universalist community ministry based in Southeast Asia. We are establishing a small free library in line with our liberal religious and social change mission. We seek to collect, steward, and lend progressive books that are more difficult for ordinary people to find. We are based in Antipolo City, just East of Metro Manila in the foothills of the Sierra Madre mountains as part of a larger cohousing community. Learn more about us at www.coralph.org.

As Unitarian Univeraliasts, we believe deeply in the ongoing search for truth and meaning. For many of us, this has meant a loving relationship with literature. Lending and gifting books are an incredible way to build connections between people, and introduce new ideas to keep our “mind on fire” as Emerson might say. We seek donations of books, and small financial contributions to help us ship and organize donated books.

Help Undocumented Students Stay in College

It’s a long road to a college education for most undocumented students. About 98,000 graduate from high school in the U.S. each year, but only 5-10 percent go to college. Once there, they walk a financial tightrope to graduation.

Tuition and living costs add up quickly; tuition alone is more than $44,000 at UC Davis for those who don’t qualify for protected status or in-state tuition. Often the first in their family to go to college, students may juggle two or three jobs to make ends meet. Those who can’t work legally have an even tougher burden, but more than 730 undocumented students have beaten the odds to attend UC Davis this year.

This campaign, supported by the Unitarian Universalist Church of Davis, aims to raise $5,000 for emergency grants to lighten their load. We have developed a relationship with SPEAK, a student-run organization at UC Davis that supports the undocumented students who are the beneficiaries of this campaign.

UUCD raised money via Faithify for the same purpose in 2017 but student need continues to outstrip resources. Last year, only a quarter of the 73 students who applied for emergency grants got them. The need is even more urgent this year.

“Especially now, with COVID-19, there’s more need for financial support,” said Ana Sandoval Contreras, co-coordinator of SPEAK. “Students have used emergency grants for paying rent, buying groceries and providing support for their families. At $200 to $300 each, it is not a lot, but money that is needed. I have received one in the past. It was very helpful. I used it to buy groceries and books.”

We see this campaign as a simple matter of social justice and access to education. It also follows UU traditions of reaching out to under-represented and vulnerable groups and collaboration across age, ethnic and economic divisions. We have received an urgent request from SPEAK leaders for help.

We hope you will support this effort to help undocumented students at a particularly scary time for immigrants in this country.

Ana’s story

Ana Sandoval Contreras, co-coordinator at SPEAK, rallying on behalf of undocumented students in front of the State Capitol.

Ana Sandoval, 21, is a fourth-year student who expects to take five years to graduate. She has relied on a variety of grants, scholarships and food vouchers to stay afloat and healthy during her college days. She currently works at the AB540 and Undocumented Center at UC Davis as a community advocate.

Born in Puebla, Mexico, she came to the United States in 2009 with her mother and sister. She was nine years old. Her father already lived here. Sandoval was told to pack one backpack with a couple of sets of clothes for a visit to her father.

“My aunt knew we were never coming back but for me, it didn’t click that this was the last time I’d see grandparents and everybody I knew back there,” she said. “It’s hit me now: the whole trauma of leaving my childhood for a whole new identity. I can’t go visit.”

Reunited with her father, Sandoval grew up in the San Fernando Valley outside Los Angeles. Her mother cleans houses. Her father is a plumber and construction worker. A variety of cousins, uncles and aunts now live nearby. A few relatives have visited from Mexico.

Sandoval started fourth grade in a year-round school that sent her back to second and third grade in off quarters so she could catch up. She learned English, made new friends but never shared her story.

When others began working on college applications, Ana didn’t think she could go. Then she attended a conference put on by the Chicano Latino Youth Leadership Project, a nonprofit that emphasizes the importance of culture, community, college and careers.

“I didn’t know I was undocumented,” she said. “It was not until I attended the conference, became really comfortable with others — and another person told their story — that I wanted to learn more about college. It was a milestone for my aspirations, my understanding about being undocumented and wanting to give back to my community.”

Now a senior at UC Davis, Sandoval is majoring in sociology and Chicano studies with a minor in education. She’s looking at graduate school and careers that range from student affairs to higher education to help students learn how to get involved and go to college.

She applied for a long list of emergency grants and scholarships to be able to afford college.

“It does feel like I’m on edge,” she said. “You can apply to 10 programs and hear from only one or two. Very few people get them. Thankfully, I’ve gotten some state support as well as grants.” Immigrant students with DACA protection have work permits, but the future of the program remains unclear. Sandoval missed qualification for DACA by a few months.

With your help, SPEAK hopes to provide emergency grants once again.

Endorsements

Laura Monica Bohorquez Garcia, Director of the AB540 and Undocumented Student Center

Laura Monica Bohorquez Garcia outside of the U.S. Supreme Court, 11/12/19

11/12/2020 marked the one year anniversary of the SCOTUS DACA Supreme Court decision. It is a day that I will always remember not only because of the decision but because of the power, strategy, and joy that I witnessed outside of the Supreme Court on 11/12/19. I carry this memory and I get to relive it everyday as I work alongside the AB540 and Undocumented Student community at UC Davis. I witness this power and joy every day when I talk to my family as someone who is part of a mixed- immigration status family and when I meet with students as the Director of the AB540 and Undocumented Student Center. Everyday I am reminded that we as an immigrant community are powerful as I see how UC Davis students own and navigate their power and use their courage to ask for help, to provide help, and to be helped. I invite you to join UC Davis students in their strength and give what your capacity allows you to.

Don Saylor, Yolo County Supervisor

Yolo County seal
DON SAYLOR
Supervisor, Second District
County of Yolo
625 Court Street, Room 204, Woodland, CA 95695-1268 (530) 666-8622
District Office: 600 A Street, Suite B Davis, CA 95616 (530) 757-5557

October 23, 2020

To Whom it May Concern:
I am writing to you in my capacity as a Yolo County Supervisor representing District 2 to convey my strong endorsement and support of the Scholars Promoting Education, Awareness and Knowledge (SPEAK) program.

As a County Supervisor, I am committed to serving and supporting all members of our community, regardless of their immigration status. In my district in Yolo County, which includes the City of Davis, City of Winters and the University of California, Davis, (UC Davis), many of the young people who attend UC Davis are first generation college students, DACA youth, or are undocumented. UC Davis is ranked as one of the top public universities in the nation, and these young people contribute greatly to its success.

SPEAK provides small emergency grants to undocumented UC Davis students to help with critical expenses when money gets tight. They are among the hardest working people I have met, but have little access to the basic resources other students take for granted. I know of cases where students chose not to eat or buy textbooks to make ends meet. During these challenging COVID-19 times with less work opportunities available, these students need our support now more than ever.

I invite you to join me in supporting the SPEAK program to offer critical support and community to these students.

In shared service,
Don Saylor, Yolo County Supervisor, District 2
Member, Unitarian Universalist Church of Davis