Tagged: “Outreach”

Reverend James Reeb...

Many Unitarian Universalists know the story of Reverend James Reeb, the UU minister who was murdered in 1965 in Selma, Alabama after answering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s nationwide call for religious leaders to come south to march in support of voting rights.

What UUs may not know is that James Reeb grew up in Casper, Wyoming, and served there as a Presbyterian minister before his faith journey led him to Unitarian Universalism and to civil rights activism. He eventually moved with his family to Washington D.C., where he served as the Assistant Minister to All Souls Unitarian Church. His next call to ministry and activism took the Reeb family to the Roxbury area of Boston where he worked for fair housing and advocated for people living in poverty.

Marie Reeb, Reverend Reeb’s widow, still resides in Casper along with many of his extended family, and yet much of the Wyoming community is unaware of his legacy and this important Wyoming connection to America’s Civil Rights Movement.

Partnering with The Table, a downtown Casper dinner church, the Unitarian Universalist Community of Casper is raising $10,000 for a James Reeb Memorial Mural here in his hometown of Casper. Understanding that UUs and others involved in social activism across the country feel deep respect and reverence for Reverend Reeb, the UU Community of Casper is extending an invitation to be a part of this unique opportunity to promote James Reeb’s legacy, social justice, community partnerships, and interfaith engagement.

The James Reeb Memorial Mural project will also include a website, a short film, and several public events to heighten access and engagement with Reverend Reeb’s story. Public art is a beautiful way to introduce this amazing story to a larger audience. The mural will be ideally located across the street from David Street Station, downtown Casper’s new and popular public square, which hosts concerts, farmers markets, and countless other public events. The mural’s public unveiling will be held August 24, 2019. Reverend Reeb’s story will also be shared at an August 28th story telling event at The Table and at the UU Community of Casper’s August 25th Sunday service. In addition, Reverend Reeb will be honored at Casper’s International Day of Peace Celebration on September 21, 2019.

The UU Community of Casper’s fundraising goal for this project is $10,000 of the $30,000 estimated total cost of the mural, film, website and public events. The remaining two thirds will come from grants and public donations. Any amounts raised by the UU Community of Casper in excess of our $10,000 goal will be contributed to the James J. Reeb Memorial Scholarship Fund at Casper College, the local community college Reverend Reeb once attended.

Our interfaith partner, The Table, is a downtown Casper dinner church led by Pastor Libby Tedder Hugus. The Table has long been involved in the Casper Mural Project to beautify and revitalize downtown Casper’s public spaces through mural art. The Table follows the teachings of Jesus, and its members and friends value and seek to honor the truth found in wisdom traditions beyond Christianity. Many UU Community of Casper members and friends enjoy participating in The Table gatherings, and Pastor Libby has been a guest speaker at our UU church.

The James Reeb Memorial Mural committee consists of individuals associated with many other Casper groups and businesses. An integral member of this committee is Reverend Reeb’s granddaughter Leah Reeb, who has traveled nationwide to share her grandfather’s legacy with UUs and others. Local mural artist Tony Elmore is working closely with the Reeb family and is seeking their guidance during his creative process.

The timing of the project is fortuitous: National Public Radio recently launched the serial podcast “White Lies,” which tells the story of Reverend Reeb, his murder in Selma and the aftermath of failed justice. His story was also included in the 2015 Academy Award nominated film “Selma.”

Please consider accepting our invitation to be a part of the James Reeb Memorial Mural Project.

2019 Building Beloved Community Beyond the Binary

Help us put love into action.

As a congregation it is our hope that this one-day conference will be both a place where trans and gender non-conforming folk can gather, connect and learn and where cisgender folk can learn about being better allies. We are also hoping that by hosting this conference we will make a BOLD statement to our larger community that we are a safe and welcoming community because we really do want to build beloved community beyond the binary.

By doing this fundraising, we are able to offer a nationally known keynote speaker and excellent workshops at a sliding scale ticket price that is accessible to all. Your contribution will also allow us to provide FREE tickets to youth and FREE childcare to those who need it.

Exciting and NEW THIS YEAR, we are working on creating a “toolbox” that will be available to other UU congregations so that they too can host a successful Building Beloved Community Beyond the Binary conference of their own.  Your support will help to spread our UU welcome throughout our Association.

 Our keynote speaker is J Mase III, who is  a Black/trans/queer poet & educator based in Seattle by way of Philly. As an educator, Mase has worked with community members in the US, UK, and Canada on LGBTQIA+ rights and racial justice in spaces such as K-12 schools, universities, faith communities and restricted care facilities. He is founder of awQward, the first trans and queer people of color talent agency.

His work has been featured on MSNBC, Essence Live, Everyday Feminism, Black Girl Dangerous, the New York Times, Buzzfeed, the Root, theGrio, Teen Vogue and more.

His current projects include being the head writer of the theatrical production, Black Bois and being co-editor of the #BlackTransPrayerBook.

Find him on Instagram (@jmaseiii) and www.jmaseiii.com!

J Mase will also be offering two workshops, in addition to the keynote – On Faith and the Criminalization of the Black Trans Body, Write Me Where It Hurts

Workshops

While workshops are being finalized, here are some topics we are planning to offer:

De-escalation and micro-aggressions

Parenting trans kids

How to make your classroom trans friendly and inclusive

On Faith and the Criminalization of the Black Trans Body

Write Me Where It Hurts

Legal rights

Preemptive Radical Hospitality

Trans 101

How to be a trans ally activist

Health issues and transitioning

This year we have a grant from the UU Funding Program – Yay!  Reaching our Faithify goal will allow to also access a challenge grant of 1500.00.  Please donate.

If you would like to register for the event click here

Donate to Color/Full...

Hi! My name is cameron, and I am thrilled to invite you to contribute to a faith-building, multicultural project I call Color/Full.

As a young convertee to Unitarian Universalism, I have attended 3 General Assemblies so far. This photography project is an extension of the creative outreach I’ve done to UUs of Color in the last three years. Please view my previous work here: https://www.facebook.com/cameronwhittenpdx/media_set?set=a.10207994556582191.1073741837.1846435264&type=3

If you’d like more details about Color/Full and why it matters, please read below. And please, please share this link and DONATE!

Color/Full project mission:

To honor Unitarian Universalists of Color through creative vehicles that highlight their beauty and their stories, and provide a compelling, alternative vision of what the future of the Unitarian Universalist community can look like.

Why it matters:

Since the founding of the Unitarian and Universalist faiths, white culture has been accepted as the norm in both the structure and spirit of the church. While many people of color are inspired by the message and values of Unitarian Universalism, those who choose to belong to Unitarian Universalism are typically expected to assimilate into white culture. This lack of space for diversity and self-determination often leaves people of color feeling invisible and isolated, and has led to many people of color to abandon any formal affiliation with Unitarian Universalism. There remains so much work to be done on racial justice — and it is critical for UUs of color to have a sense of agency and empowerment in this work.

Color/Full is a photovoice project that provides an authentic path for creative and spiritually driven action on racial justice in the Unitarian Universalist tradition, with a mission to create lasting change on the individual, cultural, and institutional level. Through the confluence of photography, community engagement, and storytelling, this project creates a venue to honor and affirm the  presence, experiences, and cultures of UUs of color.

Our Unitarian Universalist Principles call us to affirm the inherent worth and dignity of each person and to uphold justice, equity, and compassion in all human relations. Color/Full is a promising opportunity to promote a multicultural UUism that decenters whiteness and helps us get closer to making our core principles a reality.

Objectives:

  • To publish 300 photos, names, and transcribed stories of UUs of color that attend the 2018 General Assembly, posted on a Facebook page and website created exclusively to promote this project.
  • To support the new UUs of color to grow in comfort with the UU faith community.
  • To build confidence, excitement, and community among new, current, and former UUs of color.
  • To raise the visibility of UUs of color and encourage understanding and solidarity with the struggles of UUs of color.
  • To shift Unitarian Universalist Association policies that are either adopted or in consideration in regards to reconciliation on racial justice.

AID Atlanta Fund Raiser

AID Atlanta has been providing HIV/AIDS-related services, care, and education since its inception in 1982.  The agency was established in response to the devastating impact that HIV/AIDS was having on gay men in Atlanta.  In the face of fear and bigotry, founding members volunteered their time to provide support and education.  The organization quickly expanded to engage Black and Latino populations and meet the evolving needs of our diverse community in response to the epidemic.  Today, AID Atlanta offers a broad range of services and has grown to be the most comprehensive AIDS service organization in the Southeast.  AID Atlanta currently offers HIV/AIDS prevention and care services, including (but not limited to) Primary Care, HIV/STD Screening, PrEP, Community HIV Prevention Programs, Linkage Services, Case Management, and a state-wide Information Hotline.  The mission of AID Atlanta is to reduce new HIV infections and improve the quality of life of its members and the community by breaking barriers and building community.

AID Atlanta is driving its strategic direction to achieve our vision to get record numbers of individuals tested and quickly linked to care.  We are on target to achieve significant milestones towards the Agency’s transformation.  Exciting ongoing initiatives include, expanded behavioral health and case management services and an onsite 340B and retail pharmacy.

In the area of HIV outreach and education, AID Atlanta continues to actively work in communities of high impact to reach those most at risk of HIV and/or living without knowing their status.